Ben Graham, the father of value investing, wasn’t born in this century. Nor was he born in the last century. Benjamin Graham – born Benjamin Grossbaum – was born in London, England in 1894. He published the value investing bible Security Analysis in 1934, which was followed by the value investing New Testament The Intelligent Investor in 1949. Warren Buffett, the value investing messiah and Graham’s most famous and successful disciple, was born in 1930 and attended Graham’s classes at Columbia in 1950-51. And the not-so-prodigal son Charlie Munger even has Warren beat by six years – he was born in 1924!

Benjamin Graham

I’m not trying to give a history lesson here, but I find these dates very interesting. Value investing is an old strategy. It’s been around long before all the complicated formulas like the Capital Asset Pricing Model and the Black-Scholes Model (don’t worry, you don’t need them). Long before the founders of today’s hottest high-tech IPOs were even born!

And yet people have very short term memories. Once a bull market gets some legs in it, the quest to get “the most money as quickly as possible” causes prices to get bid up. Human nature kicks in and dollar signs start appearing in people’s eyes. New methodologies are touted and fundamental principles are left in the rear view mirror.

Using the latest “fool-proof” investment strategy is like running around a thunderstorm with a lightning rod in your hand: if you’re unharmed after a while then it might seem like you’ve developed a method to avoid getting struck by lightning – but sooner or later you will get hit.

As a result, value investors have historically outperformed other types of investors over the long term, and there is plenty of empirical evidence to back this up. Just check this and this and this and this out. In fact, since 1926 value stocks have outperformed growth stocks by an average of four percentage points annually, according to the authoritative index compiled by finance professors Eugene Fama of the University of Chicago and Kenneth French of Dartmouth College.

Munger (left) & Buffett (right)

So, the value investing philosophy has endured for over 80 years and is the most consistently successful strategy that can be applied. And while hot stocks, over-leveraged portfolios, and the newest complicated financial strategies will come and go, making many wishful investors rich very quick and poor even quicker, value investing will quietly continue to help its adherents fatten their wallets. It will always endure and will always remain classically in fashion. In other words, value investing is vintage.

Which explains half of this website’s name. As for the value part? The intention of this site is to explain, discuss, ask, learn, teach, and debate those topics and questions that I’ve always been most interested in, and hopefully that you’re most curious about, too. This includes:

  • What is value investing?
  • Value investing strategies
  • Stock picks
  • Company reviews
  • Basic financial concepts
  • Investor profiles
  • Economics
  • Behavioral finance
  • And, ultimately, ways to become a better investor

I want to note the importance of the way I use value here. It’s not the simplistic definition of “low P/E” stocks that some financial services lazily use to classify investors, which the word “value” has recently morphed into meaning. Vintage value investing equates to the term “Intelligent Investing,” as described by Ben Graham. Intelligent investing involves analyzing a company’s fundamentals and can be characterized by an intense focus on a stock’s price, it’s intrinsic value, and the very important ratio between the two.

So without much further ado, it’s my very good honor to meet you and you may call me

Vintage Value

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Disclaimer: I am not a registered investment advisor, broker/dealer, securities broker, or financial planner. The information on this website is provided for information purposes only. The Information is not intended to be and does not constitute financial advice or any other advice, is general in nature, and is not specific to you. Before using this website’s information to make an investment decision, you should seek the advice of a qualified and registered securities professional and undertake your own due diligence. None of the information on this site is intended as investment advice, as an offer or solicitation of an offer to buy or sell, or as a recommendation, endorsement, or sponsorship of any security, company, or fund. The Company is not responsible for any investment decision made by you. You are responsible for your own investment research and investment decisions. Use your head.